Alexander James Carter Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Alexander James Carter


Alexander J. Carter completed his PhD at Teesside University's Centre of Fascism, Anti-Fascism and Post-Fascism Studies. He has published research on radicalisation, terrorism and extremism. His first book, titled 'Cumulative Extremism: A Comparative Historical Analysis', has recently been published in Routledge's Fascism and the Far Right series.

Biography

Alex Carter earned his bachelor's degree in Politics from Kingston University before undertaking his master's degree in Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict at Birkbeck College, University of London.
He was subsequently offered a scholarship to pursue his PhD in History at Teesside University's Centre for Fascism, Anti-Fascism and Post-Fascism Studies.
Alex has worked as a researcher and practitioner in the fields of anti-racism and counter-extremism, working with universities, charities and think tanks. Further, he has published research on terrorism, political violence, extremism, radicalisation, the Northern Irish Troubles and fascism & anti-fascism. His first book, Cumulative Extremism: A Comparative Historical Analysis, has now been published in Routledge's Fascism and the Far Right book series.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Terrorism, political violence, extremism, radicalisation, the Northern Irish Troubles, fascism & anti-fascism.

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Cumulative Extremism (Carter) - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression

Cumulative extremism: escalation of movement–countermovement dynamics in Northern Ireland between 1967 and 1972


Published: Oct 03, 2016 by Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression
Authors: Alexander James Carter
Subjects: Political Science, History, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Sociology & Social Policy

The concept of cumulative extremism has recently gained currency amongst both academics and policy-makers. Despite this, there is a dearth of empirical research into the idea. This paper will address this gap in the literature by examining the Troubles in Northern Ireland from its onset in the 1960s through to its peak in 1972. In so doing, it aims to both improve the understanding of CE as well suggesting policy measures which might be employed to interrupt the escalation of such conflicts.